El Burlador De Sevilla Primera Jornada Analysis Essay

Don Juan o temor y temeridad.

Algunas observaciones más sobre

El Burhdor de Sevilla

PAR

Marc VITSE

Faculté des Lettres et Sciences Humaines de Toulouse

Al empezar, haré mías las salvedades de Bihler cuando escribe : « Es difícil presentar nuevos hallazgos sobre un tema tan conocido y discutido como El Burlador de Sevilla y Convidado de piedra, siendo tan inmensa y en parte tan difícilmente accesible la bibliografía sobre este tema. Así es preciso contar con el hecho de que algunas de las siguientes observaciones hayan sido ya expuestas en estudios que yo desconozco » (*)•

Este trabajo se presenta como una crítica - positiva y negativa - y una como síntesis de algunas de las últimas aportaciones eruditas al tema de Don Juan. Entre ellas :

1. áubrun, Charles- V. : c Le Don Juan de Tirso de Molina : essai d'interprétation ». BHi, LK, 1957, pp. 26-61.

2. Casalduero, Joaquín : « Contribución al estudio del tema de Don Juan ». Smith College Studies in Modern Languages, XIX, 1938.

(1) Bihlbr Heinrich, « Más detalles sobre ironia, simetria y simbolismo en El Burlador de Sevilla », in Actas del primer congreso internacional de hispanistas, Oxford, 1964, pp. 213-218.

(Enter DON JUAN and DUCHESS ISABELLA.)

ISABELLA:

Duke Octavio, this way will lead you out more safely.

DON JUAN:

Duchess, I again promise you my hand in marriage.

ISABELLA:

Are so many promises, offerings, gifts, compliments, and expressions of goodwill and friendship to be trusted, my dear?

DON JUAN:

Yes, my love.

ISABELLA:

I wish to light a candle.

DON JUAN:

What for?

ISABELLA:

So that my soul may bear witness to the rapture I've just experienced.

DON JUAN:

I'll extinguish your light!

ISABELLA:

Oh, heavens! Who are you, man?

DON JUAN:

Who? Just a man, no name.

ISABELLA:

You mean you're not the duke?

DON JUAN:

No.

ISABELLA:

Palace guards, come quickly!

DON JUAN:

Stop! Give me your hand, duchess.

ISABELLA:

Don't touch me, you swine! Where are the King's ministers! Soldiers, anyone, help!

(Enter the KING OF NAPLES with a lighted candle.)

KING:

What's going on here?

ISABELLA:

Help!

[Aside, recognizing the KING.] Oh, what miserable luck! It's the King himself!

KING:

What's going on?

DON JUAN:

What else? A man and a woman.

KING: [Aside.]

This calls for a measure of prudence.

[Shouts offstage.] Guards! Arrest this man!

[ISABELLA recoils to one side of the stage.]

(Enter DON PEDRO, the Spanish Ambassador, and GUARDS.)

DON PEDRO:

What's the meaning of these shouts in your chamber, Your Highness?

KING:

Don Pedro Tenorio, I'm charging you with this matter, for your hands can resolve it more cleanly than mine. Find out who these two are, but do so secretly, for I sense a scandal in the making, and I want no one else to know what I've seen here. (Exit.)

DON PEDRO: [To the GUARDS.]

Arrest him.

DON JUAN:

You wouldn't dare! You might take my life, but only at a price that will ruin whoever pays!

DON PEDRO:

Kill him.

DON JUAN:

Fine. I'm resolved to die like a knight. But let it be before the Spanish ambassador alone.

DON PEDRO: [To the GUARDS.]

Dismissed. Retire to that room with the woman.

ISABELLA: (Aside.)

I'll have to reveal my identity before my offense shouts it for all to hear, for today I'm both without honor and without Duke Octavio.

(Exit ISABELLA and the GUARDS.)

DON PEDRO:

We're alone now, so show me if there's anything behind those hotheaded words of yours.

DON JUAN:

There's plenty, but I can't direct it against an uncle.

DON PEDRO:

Tell me who you are.

DON JUAN:

I just told you: your nephew.

DON PEDRO:

Oh, my heart grows weak! What treachery is this! What have you done, you villain! Why are you dressed like that? Tell me immediately what this is about. What reckless disobedience! I could kill you! Speak!

DON JUAN:

My uncle and lord, you were once a young man as I am now, and given that you knew the passion of love, let love come to my defense. And since you order me to speak the truth, listen and I'll tell you: I deceived and ravished Duchess Isabella.

DON PEDRO:

Stop right there, don't go on! How did you manage it? Speak quietly or not at all.

DON JUAN:

I pretended to be Duke Octavio.

DON PEDRO:

Say no more, that's enough! I'm finished if the King finds out about this! What am I to do? Such a serious matter calls for ingenuity. Tell me, you scoundrel, wasn't the appalling treachery of your escapade with that noblewoman in Spain enough for you? Now you show up in Naples, in the royal palace no less, with a woman as distinguished as Isabella? May the heavens punish you, for God's sake! Your father sent you to Naples from Castile, and the frothy waters of the Italian sea offered you footing at their shores, expecting you to show gratitude for the warm welcome. And instead you offend Italy's honor through your exploits with such a distinguished woman! But digression can only harm us at this point. Tell me what do you propose to do.

DON JUAN:

I shall not offer you an excuse, for it would be disingenuous. Your blood runs through my veins, my lord; spill it, that it may avenge my offense. I am at your mercy; here is my sword. [He kneels.]

DON PEDRO:

Rise and summon your courage; your humility has overcome me. Would you dare to jump over that balcony?

DON JUAN: [Risiing.]

I would, for your favor has given me wings.

DON PEDRO:

Then I shall help you. Flee to Sicily or Milan and keep out of sight.

DON JUAN:

I'll go at once.

DON PEDRO:

Truly?

DON JUAN:

Truly.

DON PEDRO:

My letters will inform you of the outcome of this unfortunate situation you've caused.

DON JUAN: (Aside.)

Unfortunate for you, delightful for me!

(To DON PEDRO.) I confess my guilt.

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